Duke Beardsley – Art in the Big, Bold American West

Duke Beardsley – Art in the Big, Bold American West


Duke Beardsley

Duke Beardsley was well on his way to a career in medicine, when, just before med school, he took a hard turn onto a new path when he decided to pursue art as a full-time vocation. Since then, he has become one of the West’s most revered artists, producing paintings of cowboys, anglers, and the Western way of life in a style that is uniquely his own. His work is big, bold, and completely original, and it continues to grow and evolve in ways that surprise even Duke himself.

Thanks to a childhood spent between Denver and his family’s eastern Colorado ranch, Duke has been immersed in cowboy culture for as long as he can remember. He has been drawing non-stop since he could hold a crayon, and as a child (sometimes to the dismay of his parents) he demonstrated a proclivity for sketching western scenes on the walls of his family’s home. Duke is also a committed conservationist with a deep devotion to preserving the West’s landscapes and heritage. This eclectic mix of experiences and interests, combined with a formal art education, allows Duke to produce works that are ambitious, inspiring, and engaging.

I stopped by Duke’s Denver studio earlier this week, where we had a fun and wide-ranging conversation. We chat about his decision to change his career goal from medicine to art, and the value he gleaned from a formal art education.  He explains that life-long obsession with drawing on walls, and he tells some stories about how, as an adult, drawing on walls has led to surprising professional opportunities. We talk about his artistic process, his meditation practice, and how he managed his extroverted personality in the solitary world of creating art. He also discusses why land conservation is an issue that is so near and dear to his heart, and offers up some excellent book recommendations.

This was a lot of fun and I really appreciate Duke inviting me into his studio. Be sure to check the episode notes for links to everything we discuss, and check out Duke on Instagram, Facebook, and his website.

All images courtesy of Duke Beardsley


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Episode Notes

Topics Discussed:

2:40 – How Duke describes his work
3:30 – Growing up between Denver and eastern Colorado
5:15 – Artistic energy in Duke’s family
6:30 – Duke’s early path toward medicine
8:30 – Transition to art school
9:40 – Biggest lesson learned from art school
12:20 – Focusing his art on horses and the West
14:20 – Life post-art school
15:30 – How Duke’s art is different now from 20 years ago
18:30 – Drawing on the wall
20:20 – Why Duke paints big pieces
21:31 – Story behind Duke’s line ups
24:45 – Getting in “the zone” while painting line ups
26:40 – Working on multiple pieces at once
27:50 – Working with galleries
29:00 – Process for commissioned paintings
31:45 – Extrovert or Introvert?
34:30 – Duke’s artistic process
38:00 – Duke’s meditation practice
41:00 – Drawing on the wall at Las Pampas Lodge
44:00 – Working with Fishpond
45:50 – Passion for land conservation
49:30 – Favorite books
52:34 – Favorite films
54:00 – Surprising activities
54:45 – Most powerful outdoor experience
57:00 – Favorite place in the West
58:40 – Best peice of advice ever recieved
59:45 – Duke’s request of the listeners
1:00:30 – Connect with Duke online

Information Referenced

Innovators of the American West Book List

Innovators of the American West Book List


Over the past year and a half, I’ve interviewed dozens of innovators who are shaping the future of the American West—writers and ranchers, athletes and artists, conservationists and entrepreneurs, to name a few. While their vocations and backgrounds vary widely, they’re all connected by a shared love of books. All of my guests read widely and deeply, and they credit books with shaping their outlooks, work, and lives.

On each episode’s webpage, the exhaustive “episode notes” link to all books, authors, and other pertinent information discussed in the interview. So in an effort to consolidate all of this valuable information in one easy-to-access location, I compiled every book mentioned by each of my guests into this single comprehensive super-mega-list—the Innovators of the American West Book List. I’ve tried my best to organize them into logical categories, taking into account that many of the books span several genres.

As you’ll see, the books are as diverse as the guests, with topics ranging from the obvious western history and biographies, to more esoteric subjects such as military history, religion, and philosophy. Each book has played an important role in at least one of my guests’ fascinating lives, so it’s safe to say these books have been vetted and come highly recommended. For curious readers who love the American West, this list is a treasure trove.

I will continue to update this list after each new episode (last update: 9-20-17), adding newly mentioned books or authors to their respective categories. I hope this list directs you to some books that you would not have otherwise discovered and that you will continue to check back as the list grows. Enjoy!


Western History

Biographies & Memoirs

Western Issues

Adventure

Native American History

Land Management & Agriculture

General History & Natural History

Athletics

Personal Development

Fiction

Philosophy & Essays

Specifically Mentioned Authors

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Dan Flores

Dan Flores is a writer, historian, and former professor whose work explores the connections between people and the natural world in the American West. His most recent books—Coyote America and American Serengeti—are two of the most enlightening and informative books on the West’s natural history that I have ever read. The former is a biography of the coyote, a surprisingly fascinating animal with a rich and severely misunderstood history. The latter explores the last big mammals of the great plains—pronghorn, coyotes, horses, grizzlies, bison, and wolves—and also gives a great overview of North American big history.

It’s clear that Dan was a wonderful professor, because as you’ll hear in this episode, he has a real knack for explaining complicated subjects in a way that’s understandable, engaging, and exciting. This conversation gave me a glimpse into what it must have been like to be a student in Dan’s class at the University of Montana—I walked away from it full of new knowledge, and it whet my appetite to dig deeper into the many subjects we covered.

I could’ve asked Dan questions for hours and hours, but in our relatively short time together we managed to cover a lot. We start by discussing the coyote—how and why the animal has been so misunderstood, its similarities to humans, how it has managed to thrive despite efforts to totally eradicate the species, and the varying pronunciations of the word coyote. Then we discuss horses—the misconception that they are a non-native species in North America, their evolutionary history around the world, and some modern-day challenges facing the West’s few remaining wild horses. We also talk about Dan’s childhood in Louisiana, his current home in New Mexico, his favorite books on the American West, and much, much more.

This is an excellent episode and I’m excited for you to listen. If you haven’t already, buy Coyote America and American Serengeti—I can promise you’ll love them both.


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Episode Notes

Topics Discussed

3:00 – How Dan describes his work
4:10 – History of the pronunciation of “coyote”
7:30 – Coyote’s historical reputation
11:00 – Coyote’s status in Native American lore
12:30 – Mark Twain’s influence on the coyotes’ image
14:05 – Coyotes as humans’ avatars
16:15 – Fission and fusion in coyotes
18:00 – Coyotes’ ability to control their reproduction
22:20 – Dan’s thoughts on the current attempted Federal Land grab
28:45 – Misconception that horses are non-native
34:30 – Current issues with horses in the United States
37:55 – Dan’s thoughts on the BLM Wild Mustang Program
40:15 – Dan’s early years in Louisiana
43:00 – First trip to Carlsbad Caverns
45:20 – Dan’s passionate love of desert
48:55 – Living in Montana’s Bitterroot Valley
51:00 – Changes in Montana during Dan’s time there
55:00 – “In Defense of the Ranchette” article
1:01:45 – Favorite books about the American West
1:08:00 – Most powerful experience outdoors
1:09:20 – Favorite place in the West
1:11:30 – Dan’s request of the listeners
1:15:45 – Connect with Dan

Information Referenced

Noel Durant

Noel Durant is the new Executive Director of the Crested Butte Land Trust, a conservation organization that protects and stewards the ranches, trails, open space, and wildlife habit of Colorado’s Gunnison Valley. Noel took the helm of the land trust in early 2017, and he brings a wide variety of conservation experience with him into this new role. He’s worked as a member of the Interagency Hotshot Crew, fighting fires across the American West. He has also worked for regional and national conservation organizations, doing everything from managing large swaths of rural land to developing urban trail systems.

Noel’s resume speaks for itself, but what is even more impressive is his intense curiosity and deep knowledge around all things conservation. Whether discussing the history of the Gunnison Valley or the ideas of Wendell Berry, it’s clear that Noel has a true passion for his work and a vision for the future of conservation in Colorado and beyond. His practical experience combined with abundant enthusiasm is what will allow him to continue and expand the work of Crested Butte Land Trust into the future.

As listeners of the podcast know, Crested Butte in one of my favorite places in the American West. Its ranching heritage, world-class recreation, and genuine community make it a unique and rare place in today’s American West. In our conversation, Noel explains what makes Crested Butte and the Gunnison Valley so special, and how the Land Trust must balance the goals of such a wide range of various stakeholders. He talks about the history of conservation in the Valley and where he sees conservation going in the future. We also discuss his time fighting fires throughout the West, how his early life and parents shaped his love of the outdoors, and lessons learned from his various roles in conservation.

This is an excellent episode with lots of interesting information, so be sure the check the episode notes for links to everything we discuss. I’m sure you’ll agree that Crested Butte Land Trust is in great hands under the leadership of Noel. Enjoy!


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Episode Notes

Topics Discussed

2:35 – How Noel describes his work
2:55 – Crested Butte and the Crested Butte Land Trust
5:00 – Crested Butte compared to other mountain towns
7:00 – History of conservation in Crested Butte
11:00 – Variety of stakeholders and methods of conservation
16:30 – Overlap between ranchers and recreational users
19:00 – The community of the Gunnison Valley
20:15 – Early years in Tennessee
22:00 – Semester in western NC
23:50 – College at Clemson
27:00 – Time with the Interagency Hotshot Crew
29:00 – Details of a hotshot crew
33:00 – Community and purpose of the fighting fires
35:00 – Tragedies and challenges from the fire fighting world
39:45 – Moving on from fires to land conservation
43:00 – Time at Trust for Public Land
45:20 – Importance of open space in urban area
47:00 – Lessons learned from jobs in conservation
51:45 – Future of land conservation locally and nationally
56:45 – Favorite books
58:50 – Favorite documentaries
59:20 – Favorite location in the West
1:01:34 – Favorite hike in Crested Butte
1:03:00 – Best piece of advice he’s ever received
1:04:45 – Request of the listeners
1:05:45 – Connect with Noel and Crested Butte Land Trust

Information Referenced

Bryan Martin

Bryan Martin and Elizabeth Williams work at Big City Mountaineers, a Colorado-based nonprofit that transforms the lives of underserved youth through wilderness mentoring expeditions. Through partnerships with community youth programs around the United States, Big City Mountaineers exposes close to 1,000 youth per year to outdoor adventures in some of our country’s most spectacular public lands. Not only do these young people learn outdoor skills, but more importantly, they learn critical life skills while also improving their self-confidence, communication skills, and leadership abilities.

Elizabeth Williams

Prior to assuming his role as executive director at BCM, Bryan enjoyed great success with a wide variety of conservation and outdoor-related organizations including the Nature Conservancy, Continental Divide Trail Alliance, Colorado Mountain Club, and the Land Trust Alliance. Elizabeth was a teacher in India and Nepal before joining BCM as a marketing intern—10 years and a lot of hard work later, she has risen through the ranks and is now the Director of Programs. Bryan and Elizabeth share a deep enthusiasm for the outdoors and a belief that outdoor experiences can be transformative. Their passion for the work and BCM’s mission is palpable, so I know you’ll enjoy getting to know them.

I met Bryan and Elizabeth at the BCM offices in the American Mountaineering Center in Golden, Colorado, where we discussed BCM’s mission, the details of their wilderness expeditions, and why outdoor adventures can be such life-changing experiences. We chat about Bryan and Elizabeth’s professional backgrounds and learn what drew them to careers centered around the outdoors and service. They also tell a heart-warming success story in which a student overcomes her initial fears to thrive on a weeklong wilderness trip.

Thanks to Bryan and Elizabeth for taking the time to chat. Hope you enjoy!

 


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Episode Notes

Topics Discussed

3:30 – Details of Elizabeth and Bryan’s roles at BCM
5:00 – Building teamwork through outdoor experiences
7:45 – Details of the wilderness expeditions
9:10 – Areas in which BCM operates
10:00 – Teaching students with no outdoor experience about wilderness travel
14:00 – BCM’s focus on personal development and critical life skills
15:50 – Ensuring the lessons stick when the students return home
17:00 – How BCM measures success
20:00 – Evolution of BCM’s measurements of success
22:45 – How BCM selects its mentors
25:00 – Areas where the expeditions take place
26:45 – Thoughts on public lands
29:00 – Elizabeth and Bryan’s personal backgrounds
34:30 – Bryan’s biggest surprise since becoming BCM’s E.D.
36:30 – Overarching lessons learned from their careers
40:40 – “Summit for Someone” program
44:45 – A recent BCM success story
49:00 – Favorite books
52:50 – Favorite documentaries
53:50 – Craziest/most powerful outdoor experiences
59:10 – Request of the listeners
1:00:40 – Connect with BCM online

John Dunaway – The Life and Times of a Merchant Mariner

John Dunaway – Life and Times of a Merchant Mariner


John Dunaway at sea

John Dunaway is a Texas-based merchant mariner who spends six months each year traveling the world as the captain of large cargo ships. Whether cruising the calm, warm waters of Central America or avoiding Somali pirates off the coast of Africa, John’s goal is the same: deliver the cargo efficiently while ensuring the safety of his crew—quite the responsibility for a 32-year-old. When not at sea, John is an avid bird hunter, surfer, and all-around adventurer who uses his downtime to explore everywhere from Jackson Hole to Canyonlands to Antelope Island with his wife and young daughter. Thanks to a talent for photography and writing, John has gained a huge following on Instagram, where he documents his exploits on his account, AbstractConformity.

So you might be asking, what does a ship captain have to do with mountains and/or prairies? Although John may spend most of his time on the high seas, far away from the American West, you’ll notice that his optimistic perspective, focused sense of purpose, and thirst for adventure parallel the attitudes and outlooks of many of my previous podcast guests. Also like other guests, he is well read, a deep thinker, and has a genuine conservation ethic thanks to his close connection to the natural world. Although the objects of our affections may be different, our underlying values and priorities are surprisingly similar.

After almost a year of recording this podcast, I was excited to switch it up a little with this in-depth conversation with John about a subject that was fairly new to me. We start by covering the basics of his job—how one becomes a ship captain, particulars on the size of the ships, and details of day-to-day life on a 90-day ocean voyage. Then we dig deeper into some of his thoughts on leadership, his rituals and superstitions, how fatherhood has changed his outlook, and how he manages the pressure that comes along with being responsible for a massive ship, his crew, and the cargo. He also tells a few crazy stories from Africa and India, and he shares some insights from his recent trips around the American West. As usual, we discuss favorite books, films, and thoughts on conservation.

I found this to be a fascinating conversation, and I’d love to hear what you think. If you have a moment, please shoot me an email and let me know your thoughts. As always, thanks for taking the time to listen; hope you enjoy.

Photos courtesy of John Dunaway


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Episode Notes

Topics Discussed

3:00 – How John describes his work
4:20 – Details on the ships
5:40 – Length of the typical ocean voyage
8:35 – How John became a ship captain
10:25 – A typical day on an ocean voyage
12:40 – John’s morning routine
19:00 – Superstitions on the ship
21:00 – Details on the crew and boat
22:15 – How John leads his crew
25:20 – Comparing leadership methods of old-timers and younger captains
27:20 – Ernest Shackleton
28:40 – Common misconceptions
30:35 – Most dangerous areas John has visited
31:00 – Adventures with Somali pirates
33:50 – Robberies at port
36:15 – Getting a gun shoved in his chest in Mumbai
38:40 – John’s early years in Brazil and Texas
39:10 – Family ties to ships and the ocean
41:00 – John’s decision to pursue ships as a career
41:55 – John’s advice to young students at the Merchant Marine Academy
43:45 – How fatherhood has changed his perspective
49:30 – How John became a well-known photographer
54:45 – Background on John’s ability as a writer
58:00 – John’s recent adventures in the American West
1:03:30 – What was most striking about the American West
1:07:30 – Favorite books
1:10:15 – Favorite documentaries
1:11:00 – Best piece of advice he’s ever received
1:12:30 – Biggest challenge facing the oceans today
1:15:00 – John’s request to the listeners
1:15:40 – Connect with John online
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AD Maddox

AD Maddox is an accomplished artist who creates some of the most spectacular and memorable paintings of trout that I’ve ever seen. Using bright colors and unique perspectives, AD depicts trout and the fly fishing lifestyle in a way that is completely original, yet so authentic you’d be hard-pressed to find an angler who doesn’t love her work. Her art has been featured widely throughout the fishing world, including on the cover of Gray’s Sporting Journal, Patagonia apparel, and even StealthCraft drift boats.

I first encountered AD’s work when I moved to Jackson Hole in the mid-2000s. I’m not an art connoisseur, but I was instantly taken away with how she managed to capture the beauty and realistic details of trout with a contemporary and unconventional style. And just like her work, AD is a one-of-a-kind original—she spent years as a super-competitive athlete, studied exercise physiology in college, taught herself to paint without any formal art education, and rips around backroads on a Ducati motorcycle. Despite a fun-loving and easygoing exterior, she approaches her work with discipline and rigor that seem more fitting for a professional soldier than a professional artist.

Thanks to AD’s outgoing and hilarious personality, we had a very fun and wide-ranging conversation. We chatted about her many years living in Jackson Hole and how the people, landscapes, and natural beauty of that valley influenced her art. We discussed her upbringing and her parents’ role in giving her the confidence to pursue art as a full-time career. She also talks in detail about the importance of facing challenges (both in work and life) head-on and proactively, with a positive attitude and relentless work ethic. Whether you’re an artist or not, there are many wise lessons in the conversation that anyone could apply to their work and life.

SIBERIAN_RIVER_BOW

“Siberian River Bow” by AD Maddox

hopper-snack

“Hopper Snack” by AD Maddox

Photo and images courtesy of AD Maddox


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Episode Notes

Topics Discussed

2:45 – How AD describes her work
4:30 – Why AD focused on fly fishing as a primary subject
5:50 – Selling her first piece of art
7:20 – Using photos to learn to paint trout
8:45 – How her art has changed over the years
10:30 – Knowing when a painting is truly finished
12:15 – How AD learned the technical aspects of art
14:00 – AD’s artistic influences and mentors
16:00 – Lessons learned from painting mistakes
17:15 – Advantages of not waiting for permission
19:00 – AD’s optimistic attitude
21:00 – The constant quest to reinvent her art
24:00 – Writers/Artist’s block?
26:40 – AD’s early years in athletics
29:00 – Parent’s influence on her confidence
31:20 – Haters: the sign of success
34:00 – How living Jackson Hole shaped her art
35:50 – Importance of schedule, routine, and discipline
41:00 – Discipline versus inspiration
42:20 – Riding motorcycles
43:40 – How motorcycles helped her overcome personal challenges
46:00 – How personal challenges affected her art
50:00 – Favorite books
52:31 – Craziest outdoor experience
54:54 – Favorite place in the West
1:02:13 – Connect with AD online

JeffAnnJeff Lee is the co-founder of the Rocky Mountain Land Library, a residential library located on a historic ranch in one of Colorado’s most beautiful and dramatic high country grassland basins. The Buffalo Peaks Ranch, as it is known, will eventually house a collection of over 35,000 books related to natural history, conservation, and the American West. These books will be dispersed throughout ranch in houses and agricultural structures that have been preserved and restored by a growing team of enthusiastic volunteers. The ranch will become a place where individuals can immerse themselves in a natural setting, surrounded by books, for days at a time to read, write, and work on projects related to the West’s unique landscapes.

The idea for the Land Library came to Jeff and his wife Ann (the library’s other co-founder) when they visited a residential library in Europe during the mid-1990s. Given their deep love of books and land, Jeff and Ann immediately saw the potential for a similar concept in Colorado that centered around the history and landscapes of the American West. More than 20 years and tens of thousands of books later, their vision has become a reality—the Rocky Mountain Land Library is open for business and continuing to grow and evolve.

For anyone who has listened to this podcast, you know that the Land Library is my dream come true—it combines ranches, conservation, nature, and books—so I was obviously extremely excited to chat with Jeff. In a little over an hour, we covered a ton of interesting information, including the project’s backstory, the history of the ranch, and Jeff and Ann’s long term vision for the Land Library. Of course, we discuss books, and Jeff has many excellent recommendations that were brand new to me. It’s worth noting that the Land Library is in the midst of the a fundraising campaign, so I encourage you to visit their KickStarter page, watch the video, and donate to the cause… I just did, so you definitely should too! Links to everything are in the episode notes.

If you love the West, love books, and love the land, I can guarantee you will love the Land Library and this episode. Enjoy!

Photos courtesy of the Rocky Mountain Land Library


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Episode Notes

Topics Discussed

2:40 – How Jeff describes his work
3:45 – Back story on the Land Library
4:40 – Jeff’s introduction to the West
7:00 – Lake Powell, water, and differences between the East and West
7:55 – The early beginnings of Jeff’s book collection
10:55 – The initial idea for the Land Library
13:50 – Challenges of storing tens of thousands of books
17:00 – South Park, Colorado described
19:30 – Early search for a Land Library site
23:45 – Unique experience on a ranch versus pristine wilderness
25:45 – Current state of the Land Library
28:10 – Cook’s House restoration – Kickstarter Campaign
29:40 – History of Buffalo Peaks Ranch
34:10 – How Jeff defines “conservation”
35:30 – Interesting people and groups who have visited and volunteered at the ranch
40:00 – How Jeff and Ann were able to take the Land Library from an idea to reality
42:20 – Jeff’s recommended books about the West
44:45 – Recommended biographies
51:00 – The interconnectedness of historical figures
52:25 – Purchase these books at your LOCAL bookstore!!!
53:20 – Books that Jeff has gifted or recommended
57:40 – Jeff’s most powerful outdoor experience
1:00:10 – Favorite location in the West
1:03:30 – Jeff’s request of the listeners
1:04:40 – Connect with the Land Library online

* Please buy these books at your local bookseller!!!

 

 

CREDIT: David J Swift

Christian Beckwith (photo credit: David J Swift)

Christian Beckwith is the director of SHIFT, a Jackson Hole-based non-profit that is building a powerful coalition to protect our nation’s public lands. By bringing together climbers, skiers, hunters, anglers, land managers, and countless other stakeholders, SHIFT is finding common ground and harnessing these groups’ collective power to ensure that public lands—our birthright as Americans—remain safe during this tenuous time in political history.

After a distinguished career in the publishing world which included editing the American Alpine Journal and co-founding Alpinist Magazine, Christian experienced a profound change in priorities when one of his close friends was killed in an avalanche in the Teton backcountry. At that point, Christian decided to focus his resources and energy exclusively on work that makes a “substantive difference in the world.” From there he founded the Center for Jackson Hole, SHIFT, and, most recently, the Emerging Leaders Program which brings together a diverse group of early career leaders in conservation.

DSC_6628-1

Christian in his element

Christian’s career is inspiring in many ways, but I especially admire his willingness to set audacious goals, put himself on the line, and not wait around for permission to make things happen. We dig into all of these topics in our hour-long conversation, and he shares some interesting insights into his career and the future of conservation. We also discuss Christian’s early childhood experiences that led him to a career focused on adventure and the outdoors, and he talks about his relationship with Yvon Chiounard and how Chiounard has influenced him both personally and professionally.  We chat about Christian’s favorite books, documentaries, and how fatherhood has focused his thinking on the importance of conservation.  There’s a full list of the topics we discuss in the episode notes.

Given the current fights surrounding our public lands, this is a timely and powerful episode. I hope this conversation spurs you to continue educating yourself on threats to our public lands and to take appropriate action to protect them.

Photos courtesy of Christian Beckwith


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Episode Notes

Topics Discussed

2:40 – How Christian describes his work
5:10 – Changing demographics in conservation
8:30 – Genesis of the idea for SHIFT
13:00 – Avalanche in Apocalypse Couloir
15:20 – Christian’s decision to shift from publishing to conservation
18:00 – Evolution of SHIFT
20:30 – Importance of encouraging people to fall in love with wild places
21:40 – Overview of the current public land debate
25:40 – How becoming a father changed Christian’s mindset
28:20 – Collaborating with non-traditional partners of recreation
31:20 – Defining the word “conservation”
31:50 – Conservation heroes and Yvon Chouinard
35:50 – The importance of Chouinard’s internal compass
40:45 – Childhood experiences that led to a career centered around the outdoors
43:10 – First experiences climbing
45:40 – Advice to his younger self
49:30 – Favorite books
51:30 – Favorite documentaries
52:30 – Unexpected activities
54:00 – Christian’s most powerful outdoor experience
58:00 – Christian’s request of the listeners
59:00 – Connect with Christian and SHIFT online

Information Referenced

Hail_Mary_Boots_0014

Tyler Sharp

Tyler Sharp is an adventurer, sportsman, conservationist, and world traveler with a gift for telling stories through images and the written word. While he may be best known for his photography focusing on Americana and Western lifestyle, travel, and adventure, Tyler has built an impressive resume that includes filmmaking, directing, writing, and creative strategy. His work has taken him to some of the most spectacular and far-flung regions of the globe, with an emphasis on East Africa, Montana, and his home state of Texas.

As a devoted hunter and fisherman, Tyler has chased game in some of the world’s wildest regions, giving him a global perspective on the importance of natural resources, game management, and sustainable hunting practices. As you’ll hear in our conversation, Tyler has thought deeply about the practical and ethical implications of hunting and fishing both abroad and here in the American West. His sincere devotion to conservation and adventure shines through in his work and has made him the go-to photographer for iconic brands such as Filson, Cabelas, and Stetson, to name a few.

MT_August_2016_2116

Photo by Tyler Sharp

Tyler and I met up in Estes Park, Colorado, just outside of Rocky Mountain National Park, for a fun conversation that could have gone on for hours. We discussed his beginnings as a professional photographer, which started in earnest when he moved to East Africa just out of college—he’s got some intense stories from his travels that include run-ins with lions and leopards. We covered his thoughts on conservation, and how his time traveling abroad has given him a clearer understanding of conservation issues facing the American West. Then the conversation took an unexpected but interesting turn when we chatted about his commitment to Kung Fu (yes, Kung Fu!), meditation, and eastern philosophy.

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Photo by Tyler Sharp

Be sure to check out the episode notes for the full list of topics covered, because we touch on a lot.  This is a wide-ranging conversation that takes many surprising twists and turns.  Hope you enjoy!

All photos courtesy of Tyler Sharp


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Episode Notes

Topics Discussed

2:40 – How Tyler describes his work
3:40 – Tyler’s niche in the creative world
4:25 – Tyler’s background
5:35 – Heading to Los Angeles from Texas for college
7:00 – Post college adventures in Africa
8:10 – The shock of moving to Tanzania from LA
10:30 – Learning how to “grease the wheels” in Africa
11:25 – How time in Africa changed Tyler
13:20 – Threat of people versus wildlife
14:10 – Craziest experience in Africa (spoiler alert – it involves a lion!)
20:40 – Showdown with a leopard
22:20 – Transition from Africa to American West
24:15 – His choice to focus in on his passion
26:30 – Specific actions that have allowed Tyler to separate himself from the competition
31:10 – Tyler’s personal brand
32:00 – Tyler’s conservation ethic
35:00 – Discussion about conservation and hunting
39:00 – Hunters and others coming together to save public lands
40:00 – Details on The Modern Huntsman
41:55 – Blowback from posting hunting photos online
44:35 – Importance of having conversations versus fighting
46:30 – Tyler’s definition of “conservation”
50:00 – Kung Fu and other martial arts
52:50 – Physical and mental benefits of Kung Fu
56:00 – Favorite books
1:00:50 – Advice to take better landscape photos
1:03:50 – Favorite place in the West
1:05:30 – Tyler’s request of the listeners
1:09:50 – Connect with Tyler online